Very clear and concise.

The first wave hits her when she notices that both he and Ellie Oscar are much older, likely in their thirties and forties. The author mixes narrative and descriptive passages with dialogue, making the story more dynamic. Arnold’s car is a metaphor for …

Connie’s home is a symbol of weakness in a dangerous world.

"You better not! These tales serve as a reminder that all, even the young, must die and explores the romantic appeal of death.

The color of Arnold’s car is a bright gold, a very ‘flashy’ color, and he also stated that the gold paint was new, covering up old paint; this tells the reader something about Arnold. -easily missed by readers- the car gives us an important insight to Arnold’s facade. "Honey," he said, talking right through her voice, "honey, I m not coming in there but you are coming out here. Although the house is meant to physically protect her, Arnold attacks Connie at a psychological …
"Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been" Summary and Analysis.

Not affiliated with Harvard College. many different literary devices are utilized to drive the meaning of the story, one of the strongest being the use of symbols; while using symbols to build metaphors and allusions, Oates creates a text that is interesting and impactful to the generic reader. Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?

Here, we will focus on the symbolism and language of “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” by Joyce Carol Oates. Som medlem på Studienet.dk får du adgang til alt indhold. Arnold takes on a very superficial exterior, just like the car. Imagery contributes to helping the reader imagine the way characters act or look like, or the setting. In Joyce Carol Oates’s short story Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?

is a great This supports the idea that Connie is incapable of ‘driving’- or providing- for herself; which overall ties into the main theme of female empowerment while still coming to age.

The strong symbolism throughout Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? In fact, dialogue plays an important role in the short story as most of the tension in the plot is created using it: "Honey—? Instant downloads of all 1364 LitChart PDFs (including Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?).

Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. Very well organized and nicely written analysis.

Here, we will focus on the symbolism and language of “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” by Joyce Carol Oates. I'm going to call the police if you—if you don't—" The outdated quotes, written on the car in black, used to be hip, and reveals how out of touch Arnold truly is. Once Arnold’s true, violent nature comes through, the car becomes a symbol of all that is dark and ominous about his character. ( Log Out /  GradeSaver, 3 August 2015 Web. Arnold’s car is a metaphor for himself: his car is old- as Arnold is not the age he leads on to be- and painted a bright new gold, to mask old paint or in fact himself.

In “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been” it is notable that men drive and women are passengers. The allegory emphasizes Connie’s youth and vulnerability to sinister forces, as well as her initial, curious attraction to Arnold Friend. Indeed, Arnold Friend is anallegorical devil figure for the main reason that he tempts Connie, theprotagonist, into riding off with him in his car.
Symbols, Allegory and Motifs". Still, overall, it is not hard to understand the plot. Arnold takes on a very superficial exterior, just like the car. Key Symbols in Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel. Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?